A history of second hand smoke exposure: are we asking the right questions?

 A history of second hand smoke exposure:
are we asking the right questions?

CranePaperMardi A. Crane-Godreau* and Peter Payne

The 2006 Surgeon General’s Report, “Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke” (Surgeon General, 2006) documents the health implications of exposure to SHS, including firm evidence that SHS contributes to coronary and lung disease, lung can- cer, premature death in adults, slow lung development, SIDS, asthma, and ear infections in children, as well as suggestive evidence that implicate SHS in COPD, asthma, breast cancer, and nasal sinus cancer in adults, and leukemia, lymphoma, and brain tumors in children. The report indicates that there is no risk-free level of SHS. Despite evidence that SHS is a risk factor for disease, most healthcare orga- nizations and many physicians fail to ask patients about their history of SHS exposure. The implications of that failure are considerable because knowledge of a patient’s history of SHS exposure enables providers to make better-informed decisions about what to include in each patient’s examination and lab tests, and how to conduct longterm monitoring, as well as alerting the patient to the need for measures to help them avoid further smoke exposure.

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